Ohigan

Ohigan, a clean up.


In late February 2003 Kazuhide Aruga of Japan visited the College of Micronesia-FSM. He came to visit the Haruki cemetery and pay his respects to the graves of his elder brother and younger sister, Natsue. Although the remains of the adults were exhumed after World War II and returned for reburial in Japan, there were apparently infants buried in unmarked graves. Thus the site remains a cemetery due to the presence of human remains.



Kazuhide Aruga was born on 11 November 1936 in Palikir, Pohnpei. The elder brother died after a couple weeks of life. This happened before Kazuhide Aruga was born and the elder brother was either unnamed when he died or his name was not known to the younger Kazuhide Aruga. His younger sister was named Natsue. Although Kazuhide Aruga could not remember the exact location of the graves, he seemed to remember the general area as indeed being the location of the original cemetery. At ten years old Kazuhide Aruga had left for Japan after the end of the war with the rest of the Japanese population of Pohnpei.



A Pohnpeian visiting the cemetery on 10 March 2007 remarked that the layout of a set of basalt stones near the bamboo was an indication of a traditional Pohnpeian grave site. He suggested that the site might have been a burial site prior to the Japanese time in Micronesia and that the Japanese might have simply used an existing burial site.


Michelle wields a machete in the sun and tall grass

In early April a second Pohnpeian confirmed that the stones at the second grave site are clear indications of a grave. Born and raised in Palikir, he noted that the grave could be Japanese or Pohnpeian. He seemed to feel it was more likely to a be a Japanese grave.

Dukay and Michelle

Sweena



Twain




Cherlylinda and Sage hand pulling 

Casan-Jenae, Rogan

Chance with a hoe, although I am unclear as to what he is accomplishing. These photos were taken by the students/

Ravelyn

Dukay and Michelle still working in the sun

Kerat Esechu

Sebastian Yinnifel




Sebastian

Sweena

Ravelyn

Ravelyn

Ravelyn and Michelle

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