Meters per minute of longitude

Week seven began with a review of what proved to be a challenging quiz 054 064. I then introduced the class to the operating features of the GPS units. 

Tuesday I selected a hide out behind maintenance. Intermittent rain had returned on trade wind disturbances, so I opted for an accessible hide.

Mounds of dirt blocked direct lat/long access to my hide, or forced one to go over or around. There is a hole, a swale, behind the dirt hills, and I was able to hunker down under an umbrella in the long grass sufficiently that I could not be seen from the hill top.



Coordinates of the hide.

The students found me in eleven to twelve minutes, really rather quickly. I am wondering if I ought to lay in a two stage process with a relay coordinate out in the bush. That said, maintenance provided shelter from a passing rain shower and provided a place for me to run a question and answer on latitude and longitude.


Gloria Dadius on the surveyor's wheel in the 8:00 section

Laboratory seven was run straight up as per current editions of the text. I did use a conversion table to improve the accuracy of the numbers generated by the surveyor's wheel.

Meters Feet
0 0
30 98
60 197
90 295
120 394
150 492
180 591


Kerley, Gibson, Marcyliza, DeBrum, Simon, Jade, Myreesha, Rennie

This term I had a student run the surveyor's wheel, at 11:00 Liana also had the conversion sheet.

Nancy Washington, Trinia Eliou, Marcyliza Semens

Gloria at a 30 meter mark point

DeBrum Melander

Up around 60 meters, Nancy reads the longitude

Moving on towards 90 meters.

Myreesha Daniel intent on staying on latitude

The morning class naturally fanned out with Nancy on the southern right flank and Simon "Jun" Augustine on the northern left flank. 

Tae Shawn Mae Jeanette Ioanis and Simon Augustine Junior

Not a best data practice, but creative

Morning boards


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