Spice and timber plants of Pwunso


The class began with cloves I gathered from the ground. The clove trees, Syzygium aromaticum bear in December. The trees are distantly related to the Pohnpei apple tree. Cloves are a spice.

Syzygium aromaticum

Araucaria columnaris

The Cook Island pines are gymnosperms and were introduced as a timber tree. The long, linear male cones litter the ground, the round female cones remain attached to the tree at the very top of the tree.

Brady, Araucaria columnaris in the background.

Sonya, Aimina, Francina

Cinnamomum verum: Cinnamon tree. "Real" cinnamon

Cinnnamon?

Jelory at the tree, Regina, Heather, Brady on the left. 

Cycad with a cone

Same cone on a cycad

Cycads are gymnosperms too. Cones are atop these branches

Nutmeg and mace from Myristica fragrans

Eucalyptus deglupta otherwise known as the Rainbow gum tree. 


The rainbow gum tree was introduced as a timber tree from the southern Philippines. The tree has a large girth and a very straight vertical trunk.

Francina, Regina, Sonya, Nagsia, Glenn, and Jaynard

Francina, Jayleen, Suzanne, and Brady

Another view of the Cook Island pines

Brady and Jayleen

Agathis lanceolata: introduced as a potential timber product

Agathis lanceolata

Alson, Glenn, Suzanne

Glenn, Donavan

Pimenta dioica: Allspice trees. A spice tree

Francina, Sonya, Aimina look at the allspice tree


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